Reading 1: Foundations of Instruction (60)

Explore reading as a process of student engagement in construction of meaning. Gain substantive understanding of six components of reading as a process: comprehension, oral language, phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, and vocabulary. Reading 1: Foundations of Instruction (60) has replaced Reading 1: Language & Cognition, Part A & Part B.

     60 Credit Hours.

Course Objectives

Comprehension

  • Understand that building oral and written language facilitates comprehension.
  • Understand the importance of learning syntax, semantics, pragmatics, vocabulary, and text structures required for comprehension of formal written language of school, often called “academic language.”
  • Understand the impact of text upon reading comprehension (e.g., genre, readability, coherence, text structure, and text complexity).
  • Understand how the interaction of reader characteristics, motivation, purpose of reading, and text elements impacts comprehension and student engagement.
  • Identify cognitive targets (e.g., locate/recall; integrate/interpret; critique/evaluate) and the role of cognitive development in the construction of meaning of literary and informational texts.
  • Understand reading as a process of constructing meaning from a wide variety of print and digital texts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Understand the reading demands posed by domain specific texts.
  • Understand that effective comprehension processes rely on well-developed language, strong inference making, background knowledge, comprehension monitoring and self-correcting.
  • Understand how English language learners’ linguistic and cultural background will influence their comprehension.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal assessment of comprehension in making instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.
Oral Language
  • Understand how the students’ development of phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics relates to comprehending written language.
  • Understand the differences between social and academic language.
  • Understand that writing enhances the development of oral language.
  • Understand that the variation in students’ oral language exposure and development requires differentiated instruction.
  • Recognize the importance of English language learners home languages, and their significance for learning to read English.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal oral language assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.
Phonological Awareness
  • Understand phonology as it relates to language development and reading achievement (e.g., phonological processing, phonemic awareness skills, phonemic analysis and synthesis).
  • Recognize the phonological continuum beginning with sensitivity to large and concrete units of sound (i.e., words & syllables) and progressing to small and abstract units of sound (onset-rimes and phonemes).
  • Understand that writing, in conjunction with phonological awareness, enhances reading development.
  • Distinguish both phonological and phonemic differences in language and their applications in written and oral discourse patterns (e.g., language & dialect differences).
  • Understand how similarities and differences in sound production between English and other languages affect English language learners’ reading development in English.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal phonological awareness assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.
Phonics
  • Understand that phonological units (words, syllables, onset-rimes, and phonemes) map onto orthographic units (words, rimes, letters) in alphabetic languages.
  • Understand sound-spelling patterns and phonics (grapheme-phoneme correspondence rules).
  • Understand structural analysis of words.
  • Understand that both oral language and writing can be used to enhance phonics instruction.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal phonics assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.
Fluency
  • Understand that the components of reading fluency are accuracy, expression, and rate which impact reading endurance and comprehension.
  • Understand that effective readers demonstrate flexibility by adjusting their reading rate to accommodate the kinds of texts they are reading in order to facilitate comprehension.
  • Understand the relationships among fluency, word recognition, and comprehension.
  • Understand that both oral language and writing enhance fluency instruction.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal fluency assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.
Vocabulary
  • Understand the goal of receptive and expressive vocabulary instruction is the application of a student’s understanding of word meanings to multiple oral and written contexts.
  • Understand morphology as it relates to vocabulary development (e.g., morphemes, inflectional and derivational morphemes, morphemic analysis).
  • Identify principles of semantics as they relate to vocabulary development (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, figurative language, etc.).
  • Understand the domain specific vocabulary demands of academic language.
  • Understand that writing can be used to enhance vocabulary instruction.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal vocabulary assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.
Integration of the reading components
  • Identify language characteristics related to social and academic language.
  • Identify phonemic, semantic, and syntactic variability between English and other languages.
  • Understand the interdependence between each of the reading components and their effect upon reading as a process for native speakers of English and English language learners.
  • Understand the impact of oral language, writing, and an information intensive environment upon reading development.
  • Understand the importance of comprehension monitoring and self-correcting to increase reading proficiency.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal reading assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Continuing Education Units / Inservice Points

The number of credit hours listed for this course corresponds to the approximate time it takes a participant to complete the course. This information provides guidance to professional development agencies for the purpose of determining course credit.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs) or inservice points are typically awarded by the sponsoring school district. Participants should verify acceptance of online course credit with their local districts' professional development administrators.

Upon fulfillment of all requirements, your Beacon Educator transcript will reflect completion of this course. The transcript and syllabus may be printed and given to the appropriate district contact.

Click this link for additional information about BeaconEducator Course Credit.


Documentation Methods

In order to complete this course, participants must submit the following documentation. These exercises, accessible through the Course Log, must meet the established criteria.

Reflection/Dialogue Exercises (9) – Participants reflect on course content, strategy implementation, and their personal learning experiences.

Multiple Choice Quiz - (1) - Participants demonstrate knowledge of fluency instruction.

 


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