Catalog > Reading 1 : Foundations of Instruction R+

Reading 1 : Foundations of Instruction R+

Description

Explore reading as a process of student engagement in construction of meaning. Gain substantive understanding of six components of reading as a process: comprehension, oral language, phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, and vocabulary. Updates to this course address current research on core reading concepts.

Learning Objectives - FL

Performance Indicator A: Comprehension

  • 1.A.1 Understand that building oral and written language facilitates comprehension.
  • 1.A.2 Understand the importance of learning syntax, semantics, pragmatics, vocabulary, and text structures required for comprehension of formal written language of school, often called “academic language.”
  • 1.A.3 Understand the impact of text upon reading comprehension (e.g., genre, readability, coherence, text structure, and text complexity).
  • 1.A.4 Understand how the interaction of reader characteristics, motivation, purpose of reading, and text elements impacts comprehension and student engagement.
  • 1.A.5 Identify cognitive targets (e.g., locate/recall; integrate/interpret; critique/evaluate) and the role of cognitive development in the construction of meaning of literary and informational texts.
  • 1.A.6 Understand reading as a process of constructing meaning from a wide variety of print and digital texts and for a variety of purposes.
  • 1.A.7 Understand the reading demands posed by domain specific texts.
  • 1.A.8 Understand that effective comprehension processes rely on well-developed language, strong inference making, background knowledge, comprehension monitoring and self-correcting.
  • 1.A.9 Understand how English language learners’ linguistic and cultural background will influence their comprehension.
  • 1.A.10 Understand the role of formal and informal assessment of comprehension in making instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Performance Indicator B: Oral Language

  • 1.B.1 Understand how the students’ development of phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics relates to comprehending written language.
  • 1.B.2 Understand the differences between social and academic language.
  • 1.B.3 Understand that writing enhances the development of oral language.
  • 1.B.4 Understand that the variation in students’ oral language exposure and development requires differentiated instruction.
  • 1.B.5 Recognize the importance of English language learners home languages, and their significance for learning to read English.
  • 1.B.6 Understand the role of formal and informal oral language assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Performance Indicator C: Phonological Awareness

  • 1.C.1 Understand phonology as it relates to language development and reading achievement (e.g., phonological processing, phonemic awareness skills, phonemic analysis and synthesis).
  • 1.C.2 Recognize the phonological continuum beginning with sensitivity to large and concrete units of sound (i.e., words & syllables) and progressing to small and abstract units of sound (onset-rimes and phonemes).
  • 1.C.3 Understand that writing, in conjunction with phonological awareness, enhances reading development.
  • 1.C.4 Distinguish both phonological and phonemic differences in language and their applications in written and oral discourse patterns (e.g., language & dialect differences).
  • 1.C.5 Understand how similarities and differences in sound production between English and other languages affect English language learners’ reading development in English.
  • 1.C.6 Understand the role of formal and informal phonological awareness assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Performance Indicator D: Phonics

  • 1.D.1 Understand that phonological units (words, syllables, onset-rimes, and phonemes) map onto orthographic units (words, rimes, letters) in alphabetic languages.
  • 1.D.2 Understand sound-spelling patterns and phonics (grapheme-phoneme correspondence rules).
  • 1.D.3 Understand structural analysis of words.
  • 1.D.4 Understand that both oral language and writing can be used to enhance phonics instruction.
  • 1.D.5 Understand the role of formal and informal phonics assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Performance Indicator E: Fluency

  • 1.E.1 Understand that the components of reading fluency are accuracy, expression, and rate which impact reading endurance and comprehension.
  • 1.E.2 Understand that effective readers demonstrate flexibility by adjusting their reading rate to accommodate the kinds of texts they are reading in order to facilitate comprehension.
  • 1.E.3 Understand the relationships among fluency, word recognition, and comprehension.
  • 1.E.4 Understand that both oral language and writing enhance fluency instruction.
  • 1.E.5 Understand the role of formal and informal fluency assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Performance Indicator F: Vocabulary

  • 1.F.1 Understand the goal of receptive and expressive vocabulary instruction is the application of a student’s understanding of word meanings to multiple oral and written contexts.
  • 1.F.3 Understand morphology as it relates to vocabulary development (e.g., morphemes, inflectional and derivational morphemes, morphemic analysis).
  • 1.F.3 Identify principles of semantics as they relate to vocabulary development (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, figurative language, etc.).
  • 1.F.41 Understand the domain specific vocabulary demands of academic language.
  • 1.F.5 Understand that writing can be used to enhance vocabulary instruction.
  • 1.F.6 Understand the role of formal and informal vocabulary assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Performance Indicator G: Integration of the reading components

  • 1.G.1 Identify language characteristics related to social and academic language.
  • 1.G.2 Identify phonemic, semantic, and syntactic variability between English and other languages.
  • 1.G.3 Understand the interdependence between each of the reading components and their effect upon reading as a process for native speakers of English and English language learners.
  • 1.G.41 Understand the impact of oral language, writing, and an information intensive environment upon reading development.
  • 1.G.5 Understand the importance of comprehension monitoring and self-correcting to increase reading proficiency.
  • 1.G.6 Understand the role of formal and informal reading assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Learning Objectives

Comprehension

  • Understand that building oral and written language facilitates comprehension.
  • Understand the importance of learning syntax, semantics, pragmatics, vocabulary, and text structures required for comprehension of formal written language of school, often called “academic language.”
  • Understand the impact of text upon reading comprehension (e.g., genre, readability, coherence, text structure, and text complexity).
  • Understand how the interaction of reader characteristics, motivation, purpose of reading, and text elements impacts comprehension and student engagement.
  • Identify cognitive targets (e.g., locate/recall; integrate/interpret; critique/evaluate) and the role of cognitive development in the construction of meaning of literary and informational texts.
  • Understand reading as a process of constructing meaning from a wide variety of print and digital texts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Understand the reading demands posed by domain specific texts.
  • Understand that effective comprehension processes rely on well-developed language, strong inference making, background knowledge, comprehension monitoring and self-correcting.
  • Understand how English language learners’ linguistic and cultural background will influence their comprehension.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal assessment of comprehension in making instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Oral Language

  • Understand how the students’ development of phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics relates to comprehending written language.
  • Understand the differences between social and academic language.
  • Understand that writing enhances the development of oral language.
  • Understand that the variation in students’ oral language exposure and development requires differentiated instruction.
  • Recognize the importance of English language learners’ home languages, and their significance for learning to read English.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal oral language assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Phonological Awareness

  • Understand phonology as it relates to language development and reading achievement (e.g., phonological processing, phonemic awareness skills, phonemic analysis and synthesis).
  • Recognize the phonological continuum beginning with sensitivity to large and concrete units of sound (i.e., words & syllables) and progressing to small and abstract units of sound (onset-rimes and phonemes).
  • Understand that writing, in conjunction with phonological awareness, enhances reading development.
  • Distinguish both phonological and phonemic differences in language and their applications in written and oral discourse patterns (e.g., language & dialect differences).
  • Understand how similarities and differences in sound production between English and other languages affect English language learners’ reading development in English.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal phonological awareness assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Phonics

  • Understand that phonological units (words, syllables, onset-rimes, and phonemes) map onto orthographic units (words, rimes, letters) in alphabetic languages.
  • Understand sound-spelling patterns and phonics (grapheme-phoneme correspondence rules).
  • Understand structural analysis of words.
  • Understand that both oral language and writing can be used to enhance phonics instruction.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal phonics assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Fluency

  • Understand that the components of reading fluency are accuracy, expression, and rate which impact reading endurance and comprehension.
  • Understand that effective readers demonstrate flexibility by adjusting their reading rate to accommodate the kinds of texts they are reading in order to facilitate comprehension.
  • Understand the relationships among fluency, word recognition, and comprehension.
  • Understand that both oral language and writing enhance fluency instruction.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal fluency assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Vocabulary

  • Understand the goal of receptive and expressive vocabulary instruction is the application of a student’s understanding of word meanings to multiple oral and written contexts.
  • Understand morphology as it relates to vocabulary development (e.g., morphemes, inflectional and derivational morphemes, morphemic analysis).
  • Identify principles of semantics as they relate to vocabulary development (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, figurative language, etc.).
  • Understand the domain specific vocabulary demands of academic language.
  • Understand that writing can be used to enhance vocabulary instruction.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal vocabulary assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Integration of the reading components

  • Identify language characteristics related to social and academic language.
  • Identify phonemic, semantic, and syntactic variability between English and other languages.
  • Understand the interdependence between each of the reading components and their effect upon reading as a process for native speakers of English and English language learners.
  • Understand the impact of oral language, writing, and an information intensive environment upon reading development.
  • Understand the importance of comprehension monitoring and self-correcting to increase reading proficiency.
  • Understand the role of formal and informal reading assessment to make instructional decisions to meet individual student needs.

Documentation Methods

Participants must document their learning by completing the following summatives.

1 Multiple Choice Exam - Learner demonstrates knowledge of content by selecting the correct answer from the choices provided.
9 Reflections - Learner synthesizes previous knowledge and course content in order to develop a narrative response.

The summatives must meet 80% of the established criteria.

Project Team

Author: Kay Landingham

Developed by Beacon Educator staff.


Course Last Updated: 2022